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27 Enero en la Historia

 


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27 Enero en la Historia,

Today in History,

Hoy en la Historia,

Highlights:

Soviet troops liberate Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps;

Peace accords signed to end Vietnam War;

3 Astronauts die in Apollo One fire;

National Geographic Society founded;

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart born;

Composer Jerome Kern born.

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Images & Sounds from Today’s History

———-History Channel

Associated Press

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BBC In Context  “Written as if the event had only just ocurred” 

1945:

Soviet troops liberate Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps

auschwitz-gate_1

Liberation-of-Auschwitz_7

Thousands of items of children’s clothing were found after the camp was liberated

The Red Army has liberated the Nazis’ biggest concentration camp at Auschwitz in south-western Poland. According to reports, hundreds of thousands of Polish people, as well as Jews from a number of other European countries, have been held prisoner there in appalling conditions and many have been killed in the gas chambers.

Few details have emerged of the capture of Auschwitz, which has gained a reputation as the most notorious of the Nazi death camps.

Some reports say the German guards were given orders several days ago to destroy the crematoria and gas chambers. Tens of thousands of prisoners – those who were able to walk – have been moved out of the prison and forced to march to other camps in Germany.

Little did we know that we had arrived at a place, the name of which would become as well known and remembered as any battle in the war
People’s War memories »

Details of what went on at the camp have been released previously by the Polish Government in exile in London and from prisoners who have escaped.

auschwitz-gate_2 

Liberation-of-Auschwitz_5

In July 1944 details were revealed of more than 400,000 Hungarian Jews who were sent to Poland many of whom ended up in Auschwitz. They were loaded onto trains and taken to the camp where many were put to death in the gas chambers.

Before they went they were told they were being exchanged in Poland for prisoners of war and made to write cheerful letters to relatives at home telling them what was happening.

According to the Polish Ministry of Information, the gas chambers are capable of killing 6,000 people a day.

Another report from Poland told of mass arrests in the village of Garbatka near Radom in the early hours of one morning in August 1942. Workmen were accused of plotting to blow up a local factory. Twenty were executed on the spot, the rest were sent to Auschwitz.

Liberation-of-Auschwitz_2

Since its establishment in 1940, only a handful of prisoners have escaped to tell of the full horror of the camp.

In October last year, a group of Polish prisoners mounted an attack on their German guards. The Germans reportedly machine-

gunned the barracks killing 200 Polish prisoners. The Poles succeeded in killing six of their executioners.

When the Red Army arrived at the camp they found only a few thousand prisoners remaining. They had been too sick to leave.

The capture of Auschwitz comes as the Red Army has made important advances on three fronts: in East Prussia to the north, in western Poland as well as Silesia in eastern Germany. Fighting is continuing around the historic Polish western city of Poznan.

The Polish capital, Warsaw, was liberated a week ago after five-and-a-half years of German occupation.

auschwitz-gate_2

In Context

Although few details of the liberation of Auschwitz were given in the British press at the time, it had gained a reputation as the worst of the German concentration camps.On 8 May 1945 a State commission compiled by the Soviets with advice from Polish, French and Czechoslovak experts revealed the full horror of conditions at the camp.

Liberation-of-Auschwitz_6

Nearly 3,000 survivors of various nationalities were questioned and on the basis of their evidence the report estimated 4,000,000 people had perished there between 1941 and early 1945.

The dead included citizens from the Soviet Union, Poland, France, Belgium, Holland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Italy and Greece.

The commission, which had previously investigated conditions at Majdanek, Treblinka and other camps, described Auschwitz as the worst in its experience.

It found evidence of experiments carried out on humans “of a revolting character”.

According to the evidence, the commission said the Germans had moved out up to 60,000 inmates – those still fit enough to walk – when they retreated. The few thousand who were left behind were freed by the Russians.

Liberation-of-Auschwitz_4

They also found seven tons of women’s hair, human teeth, from which gold fillings had been extracted and tens of thousands of children’s outfits.

The final death toll was later revised downwards, by the Auschwitz Museum, to between 1 and 1.5 million, including almost 1m Jews.

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History Channel  –  “This Day in History” 

1967

Astronauts die in launch pad fire

Resultado de imagen de 3 Astronauts died in Apollo One fire

Imagen relacionadaA launch pad fire during Apollo program tests at Cape Canaveral, Florida, kills astronauts Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chafee. An investigation indicated that a faulty electrical wire inside the Apollo 1 command module was the probable cause of the fire. The astronauts, the first Americans to die in a spacecraft, had been participating in a simulation of the Apollo 1launch scheduled for the next month.

The Apollo program was initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) following President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 declaration of the goal of landing men on the moon and bringing them safely back to Earth by the end of the decade. The so-called “moon shot” was the largest scientific and technological undertaking in history. In December 1968, Apollo 8was the first manned spacecraft to travel to the moon, and on July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. walked on the lunar surface. In all, there were 17 Apollo missions and six lunar landings.

 

BBC In Context  “Written as if the event had only just ocurred” 

1967: Three astronauts die in Apollo 1 tragedy

Three American astronauts have died after fire swept through the Apollo spacecraft designed for a manned flight to the Moon during rehearsals at Cape Kennedy.It is thought an electrical spark started in the area holding oxygen supplies and other support systems. The fire spread quickly in the oxygen-filled atmosphere of the capsule, killing the crew within seconds.

The space crew, flight commander Gus Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee, were taking part in a test run for the launch of the first Apollo mission.

Navy Lieutenant Commander Chaffee, aged 31, had never flown in space before. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Grissom, 39, was the first American to make two flights. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel White, 35, made America’s first space walk.

There will be risks, as there are in any experimental programme, and sooner or later, we’re going to … lose somebody
Gus Grissom

It is feared the disaster on launch pad 34 could delay America’s plans to put a man on the Moon by as much as a year.The three men were in the command module, mounted on the Saturn rocket as if ready for launch, but Saturn was not loaded with fuel.

At 1831 hours one of the astronauts was heard to say, “Fire, I smell fire.”

Two seconds later, another astronaut, probably Lt Col White said, “Fire in the cockpit.”

The fire spread through the cabin rapidly. The last communication from the crew was heard just 17 seconds later.

The pressurised atmosphere inside the capsule meant the astronauts would not have had time to open the hatch.

Under ideal conditions, the process takes about 90 seconds. It involves venting the cabin to relieve the interior pressure which helps hold the door closed.

It took technicians on the outside about five minutes after the fire had started to open the hatch.

There will be a full investigation into what caused the fire, but already questions are being asked about whether safety corners were cut in the race to be first to the Moon.

The astronauts knew there were risks involved. Lt Col Grissom became the second American in space in the Liberty Bell 7. On splashdown, the space capsule filled with water and sank and he almost drowned.

A few weeks before the launch pad tragedy, he wrote: “There will be risks, as there are in any experimental programme, and sooner or later, we’re going to run head-on into the law of averages and lose somebody.

“I hope this never happens, and… perhaps it never will, but if it does, I hope the American people won’t think it’s too high a price to pay for our space programme.”

The Apollo mission’s maiden flight was due to blast off into space on 21 February.

In Context
President Lyndon Johnson paid tribute to the astronauts saying: “Three valiant young men have given their lives in the nation’s service. We mourn this great loss and our hearts go out to their families.”The Apollo 1 tragedy led to a major investigation and criticism was levelled at Nasa for its complacency in underestimating the likelihood of fire.

A number of modifications were made to the Apollo spacecraft: the hatch was redesigned and made easier to open from the inside, the interior of the capsule was made more fireproof, the atmosphere was changed to a less flammable mixture of nitrogen and oxygen rather than just pure oxygen and the astronauts were given fireproof suits.

The space programme was delayed but not halted. On 25 May 1961 President John F Kennedy had committed Americans to landing a man on the Moon by the end of the decade.

Apollo 7 was successfully launched on 11 October 1968 for its maiden crewed voyage.

Less than a year later in July 1969, Apollo 11 landed Neil Armstrong on the Moon.

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  More – Images & Sounds   

1973

Peace accords signed to end Vietnam War

Resultado de imagen de Peace accords signed to end Vietnam War PARIS

The United States, South Vietnam, Viet Cong, and North Vietnam formally sign “An Agreement Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam” in Paris. Due to South Vietnam’s unwillingness to recognize the Viet Cong’s Provisional Revolutionary Government, all references to it were confined to a two-party version of the document signed by North Vietnam and the United States—the South Vietnamese were presented with a separate document that did not make reference to the Viet Cong government. This was part of Saigon’s long-time refusal to recognize the Viet Cong as a legitimate participant in the discussions to end the war.

Imagen relacionada

Kissinger Le Duc Tho Signed on January 27, 1973

The settlement included a cease-fire throughout Vietnam. It addition, the United States agreed to the withdrawal of all U.S. troops and advisors (totalling about 23,700) and the dismantling of all U.S. bases within 60 days. In return, the North Vietnamese agreed to release all U.S. and other prisoners of war.

Both sides agreed to the withdrawal of all foreign troops from Laos and Cambodia and the prohibition of bases in and troop movements through these countries. It was agreed that the DMZ at the 17th Parallel would remain a provisional dividing line, with eventual reunification of the country “through peaceful means.” An international control commission would be established made up of Canadians, Hungarians, Poles, and Indonesians, with 1,160 inspectors to supervise the agreement. According to the agreement, South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu would continue in office pending elections. Agreeing to “the South Vietnamese People’s right to self-determination,” the North Vietnamese said they would not initiate military movement across the DMZ and that there would be no use of force to reunify the country.

Footnote: The last U.S. serviceman to die in combat in Vietnam, Lt. Col. William B. Nolde, was killed by an artillery shell at An Loc, 60 miles northwest of Saigon, only 11 hours before the truce went into effect.

 

1888

National Geographic Society founded

On January 27, 1888, the National Geographic Society is founded in Washington, D.C., for “the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge.”

The 33 men who originally met and formed the National Geographic Society were a diverse group of geographers, explorers, teachers, lawyers, cartographers, military officers and financiers. All shared an interest in scientific and geographical knowledge, as well as an opinion that in a time of discovery, invention, change and mass communication, Americans were becoming more curious about the world around them. With this in mind, the men drafted a constitution and elected as the Society’s president a lawyer and philanthropist named Gardiner Greene Hubbard. Neither a scientist nor a geographer, Hubbard represented the Society’s desire to reach out to the layman.

Nine months after its inception, the Society published its first issue of National Geographic magazine. Readership did not grow, however, until Gilbert H. Grosvenor took over as editor in 1899. In only a few years, Grosvenor boosted circulation from 1,000 to 2 million by discarding the magazine’s format of short, overly technical articles for articles of general interest accompanied by photographs. National Geographic quickly became known for its stunning and pioneering photography, being the first to print natural-color photos of sky, sea and the North and South Poles.

The Society used its revenues from the magazine to sponsor expeditions and research projects that furthered humanity’s understanding of natural phenomena. In this role, the National Geographic Society has been instrumental in making possible some of the great achievements in exploration and science. To date, it has given out more than 1,400 grants, funding that helped Robert Peary journey to the North Pole, Richard Byrd fly over the South Pole, Jacques Cousteau delve into the sea and Jane Goodall observe wild chimpanzees, among many other projects.

Today, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions. National Geographic continues to sell as a glossy monthly, with a circulation of around 9 million. The Society also sees itself as a guardian of the planet’s natural resources, and in this capacity, focuses on ways to broaden its reach and educate its readers about the unique relationship that humans have with the earth.

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Hoy en la Historia del Mundo

 Efemérides

27 DE ENERO

711 Mientras Rodrigo se enfrenta a los vascones, Tariq ibn Ziyad al-Layti llega a Tarifa (Cádiz) con un numero de hombres de unos 7000 de a pie y ocupan Algeciras (Cádiz), derrotando a las fuerzas que mandaba Sancho, sobrino de Rodrigo y comenzando así la ocupación musulmana de la península Ibérica.

1069 Muere en Sevilla el rey de la taifa Abbad ibn Muhammad al-Mutadid.

1255 Muere el príncipe granadino Abu Said Faray, hijo del sultán Muhammad I.

1500 El rey Fernando el Católico parte de Sevilla para Granada con el fin de apaciguar la rebelión de los moriscos.

1554 Cerca de Cádiz (España), naufraga y muere el navegante español Pedro de Heredia, fundador de Cartagena de Indias (Colombia).


1612 Felipe III otorga el primer privilegio para dar corridas en cosos cerrados, origen de las plazas de toros.

1785 Fundación del Jardín Botánico de Madrid.

1794 En la isla de Santo Domingo, una flota española al mando del almirante Gabriel de Aristizábal toma a los franceses la plaza de Fuerte Delfín.(imágen dch)

1801 En Santo Domingo, la revolución de los esclavos haitianos provoca el pavor entre los colonos blancos. Mientras tanto, un antiguo esclavo, Toussaint-Louverture, se convierte en dictador de la isla.

1801 La ciudad de Santa Cruz de Tenerife es declarada capital de la Provincia de Canarias por el rey Fernando VII.

1810 Después de tomar por las armas la ciudad de Alcalá la Real (Jaén), la columna francesa avanza hacia Granada, apoderándose del parque de Artillería, enclavado en las inmediaciones de Iznalloz.

1865 Tratado Vivanco-Pareja de paz y amistad entre Perú y España, que no será aceptado por la mayoría de los sectores peruanos.

1868 En Japón se inicia la decisiva Batalla de Toba-Fushimi que marcaría el fin del Shogunato Tokugawa y el inicio del régimen imperial Meiji.

1871 EN Argentina mueren en Buenos Aires tres personas durante los festejos de carnaval; esto trata de ocultarse pero terminan siendo 14.000 las víctimas. Eduardo Wilde asevera que es fiebre amarilla.

1880 En EE. UU., Thomas Alva Edison patenta la lámpara incandescente.

1888 EE. UU., se funda la National Geographic Society, con el propósito de incrementar y difundir los conocimientos geográficos.

1908 En Buenos Aires (Argentina), el presidente José Figueroa Alcorta (imágen izq), ordena a la policía que ocupe el Congreso Nacional.

1915 Se registra el primer bombardeo aéreo de la Historia: aviones franceses atacan fábricas de explosivos alemanas en las ciudades de Oppau y Ludwigshafen.

1916 En San Diego (California), después de una larga sequía, las lluvias provocan la inundación “Hatfield”, llamada así por el estafador Charles Hatfield, quien cobraba 10 000 dólares por crear la lluvia. Se destruyen las represas de Sweetwater y Otay en consecuencia mueren 22 personas y cuando
Hatfield trata de cobrar su cheque, la alcaldía le propone hacerse cargo de las indemnizaciones por
varios millones de dólares.

1917 En San José (Costa Rica), el general Federico Alberto Tinoco Granados derriba al presidente Alfredo González Flores.

1925 En Madrid se inaugura del Teatro Alcázar.

1932 Son detenidos el alcalde, el juez municipal y varios concejales de Mollina (Málaga), tras conocerse que preparaban una revolución.

1943 El Generalísimo Franco y su Ministro del Ejército Asensio Cabanillas, firman un nuevo Decreto para el reglamento de la Uniformidad Militar. En él se manda que en los nuevos uniformes se coloque nuevamente El Aguila de San Juan de color dorado con la corona imperial y la cruz de Santiago en su interior(espada, Arma ,Cruz, milicia y religión). 

1944 En Leningrado, actual San Petersburgo (Federación Rusa) fin del sitio nazi a la ciudad tras 29 meses y aproximadamente 1,5 millones de muertos.

1945 En Polonia, el Ejército Soviético libera el campo de concentración nazi de Auschwitz.(imágen dch)

1948 En EE. UU. sale a la venta el primer grabador de cinta magnética.

1951 En Madrid se inaugura el Museo Lázaro Galdiano.

1951 En el sitio de pruebas de Nevada en el marco de la operación Ranger, Estados Unidos detona la bomba atómica Able (de 1 kilotón), la novena de la Historia.

1952 La Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) sesiona por primera vez en su sede de Nueva York.

1956 En Estados Unidos se termina de grabar el primer disco de Elvis Presley

1960 El expresidente Juan Domingo Perón, en el exilio, abandona la República Dominicana y se traslada a España.

1960 En Bolivia queda abolida la pena de muerte.

1967 En Cabo Kennedy (Florida) mueren los astronautas estadounidenses Virgil I. Grissom, Edward White y Roger Chaffee, al incendiarse la cápsula de la nave espacial Apolo 1, la primera misión del programa Apolo.

1973 Estados Unidos y Vietnam del Norte firman un acuerdo de cese al fuego.

1977 El guardia civil José María Lozano Sainz (imágen izq), natural de Almería, es asesinado en Madrid por la banda criminal GRAPO.

1978 Se produce un motín en la cárcel de Málaga con un balance de cinco heridos y cuantiosos daños materiales.

1982 En Honduras accede a la presidencia el civil Roberto Suazo Córdova tras una década de dictadura militar.

1982 En Estados Unidos, los periódicos New York Times y Washington Post denuncian la masacre de El Mozote perpetrada por el Gobierno de El Salvador entre el 10 y el 12 de diciembre de 1981. Sin embargo cinco días después, los republicanos en el Congreso (a pedido del presidente Ronald Reagan) aprueban un nuevo aumento en la ayuda estadounidense a Duarte.

1986 En Honduras José Azcona del Hoyo asume como presidente de la República.

1989 En el Puerto espacial de Kourou (Guayana), Francia lanza el cohete Ariane, que pone en órbita con éxito el satélite de comunicaciones Intelsat VF-15 (servicios de televisión y telefonía).

1990 En Honduras Rafael Leonardo Callejas asume a la presidencia.

1993 En Madrid mueren seis personas al caer sobre ellas la marquesina de un cine.

1993 En España se encuentran los cuerpos de las adolescentes asesinadas en el Crimen de Alcácer.

1994 En Honduras, el liberal Carlos Roberto Reina asume la presidencia.(imágen dch)

1994 En España, huelga general contra el proyecto de reforma laboral emprendida por el gobierno.

1995 Perú y Ecuador inician una guerra por la disputa de 340 kilómetros cuadrados fronterizos. Los combates se llevan a cabo en seis puestos de la frontera que separa a ambos países.

1998 Carlos Roberto Flores asume a la presidencia de Honduras.

1998 El PP abre una suscripción popular para pagar la seguridad de sus cargos en Euskadi.

1999 En EE. UU., el papa Juan Pablo II, condena el aborto y la pena de muerte durante su viaje a varias ciudades de ese país.

1999 La rebaja del IRPF aumentará el poder adquisitivo de los pensionistas españoles en 100.000 millones de pesetas.

2000 La compañía CocaCola anuncia una reducción de la plantilla laboral en 6.000 trabajadores para hacer frente a las pérdidas.

2000 En Madrid, la obra de Francisco de Goya “La condesa de Chinchón” (imágen izq), ingresa en la colección del Museo del Prado.

2001 El ex-dictador chileno Augusto Pinochet ingresado de urgencia tras sufrir un amago de infarto cerebral.

2002 José María Aznar formaliza en el Congreso de su partido su decisión de no volver a ser candidato a la Presidencia del Gobierno.

2002 Ricardo Maduro se convierte en presidente de Honduras.

2006 Manuel Zelaya se convierte en presidente de Honduras.

2006 El paro se sitúa en España en el 8,7% y alcanza los niveles de 1978.

2006 Cinco personas fallecen al estrellarse un caza del ejército y un helicóptero comercial en dos accidentes ocurridos en Badajoz y Lorca (Murcia).

2010 Steve Jobs presenta en conferencia de prensa el iPad

2010 Porfirio Lobo asume a la presidencia de Honduras.

2012 La compañía aérea Spanair (imágen dch) cesa sus operaciones comerciales, poniendo fin a 26 años de historia.

2013 Un incendio en una discoteca en Santa María, Río Grande del Sur, Brasil deja un saldo de 241 fallecidos y 131 heridos.

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 Hispanópolis

Enero 27 se celebra…

  • Día del Holocausto, el día elegido recuerda el 27 de enero de 1945, cuando se produjo la liberación del campo de concentración de Auschwitz (Polonia).
Enero 27 en la Historia del Mundo …

2010 entra en vigor el SUCRE, moneda virtual del ALBA.
2009 El investigador francés Christopher Augur es asaltado por un grupo de delincuentes a las afueras del Aeropuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de México, falleciendo cuatro días después a causa de un balazo recibido en la cabeza durante el asalto.
2002 José María Aznar formaliza en el Congreso de su partido su decisión de no volver a ser candidato a la Presidencia del Gobierno.
2001 El ex dictador chileno Augusto Pinochet ingresado de urgencia tras sufrir un amago de infarto cerebral.
2000 La obra de Francisco de Goya “La Condesa de Chinchón”, ingresa en la colección del Museo del Prado.
1999 El Papa, Juan Pablo II, condena el aborto y la pena de muerte durante su viaje a varias ciudades de los Estados Unidos.
1995 Perú y Ecuador inician una guerra por la disputa de 340 kilómetros cuadrados fronterizos. Los combates se llevan a cabo en seis puestos de la frontera que separa a ambos países.
1994 El liberal Carlos Roberto Reina Idiáquez asume la presidencia de Honduras.
1994 Huelga general en España contra el proyecto de reforma laboral emprendida por el gobierno.
1993 Seis personas mueren en Madrid al caer sobre ellas la marquesina de un cine.
1989 El cohete europeo “Ariane”, lanzado desde la base francesa de Juro (Guayana), pone en órbita con éxito el satélite de comunicaciones Intelsat VF-15 (servicios de televisión y telefonía).
1982 Accede a la presidencia de Honduras el civil Roberto Suazo Córdova, tras una década de dictadura militar.
1973 Se firma un acuerdo de cese al fuego entre Estados Unidos y Vietnam del Norte.
1967 Mueren los astronautas norteamericanos Virgil I. Grissom, Edward White y Roger Chaffee, al incendiarse la cápsula de la nave espacial Apollo 1, la primera misión del programa Apollo.
1960 Juan Domingo Perón abandona la República Dominicana y se traslada a España.
1960 Queda abolida la pena de muerte en Bolivia.
1951 Inauguración del museo Lázaro Galdiano, en Madrid.
1948 Se vende el primer grabador de cinta magnética.
1945 El Ejército Soviético llega al campo de concentración de Auschwitz.
1926 El científico escocés John Logie Baird presenta ante la Royal Institution un aparato llamado televisión, capaz de transmitir imágenes a distancia por la acción de los rayos catódicos.
1925 Inauguración del teatro “Alcázar” de Madrid.
1917 Caída del Presidente de Costa Rica Alfredo González Flores. El general Federico Alberto Tinoco Granados se proclama presidente provisional.
1915 Primer bombardeo aéreo masivo que registra la Historia: fue realizado por aviones franceses contra fábricas de explosivos alemanas en las ciudades de Oppau y Ludwigshafen.
1908 El Presidente de Argentina, José Figueroa Alcorta le ordena a la policía la ocupación del Congreso Nacional.
1888 Se funda la National Geographic Society en Estados Unidos, con el propósito de incrementar y difundir los conocimientos geográficos.
1880 Thomas Alva Edison patenta la lámpara incandescente.
1865 Tratado Vivanco-Pareja de paz y amistad entre Perú y España, que no será aceptado por la mayoría de los sectores peruanos.
1801 La revolución de los esclavos haitianos provoca en Santo Domingo el pavor entre los colonos blancos, y un antiguo esclavo, Toussaint-Louverture, se convierte en dictador de la isla.
1794 Una flota española, al mando del almirante Gabriel de Aristizábal, toma a los franceses la plaza de Fuerte Delfín, en la isla de Santo Domingo.
1612 Felipe III de España otorga el primer privilegio para dar corridas en cosos cerrados, origen de las plazas de toros.
1544 Naufraga y muere cerca de Cádiz el navegante español Pedro de Heredia, fundador de Cartagena de Indias.
Nacimientos Notables en Enero 27 …

1980 Marat Safin, tenista ruso.
1977 Ximena Capristo, vedette argentina.
1976 Ahn Jung-Hwan, futbolista surcoreano.
1974 Andrei Pavel, tenista rumano.
1968 Mike Patton, vocalista estadounidense (Faith No More).
1968 Tricky, músico británico.
1964 Bridget Fonda actriz estadounidense.
1957 Frank Miller, dibujante de novelas gráficas estadounidense.
1957 Janick Gers, guitarrista británico (Iron Maiden).
1955 John Roberts, juez de la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos.
1944 Nick Mason, baterista británico (Pink Floyd).
1940 James Cromwell, actor estadounidense.
1931 Mordecai Richler, escritor canadiense.
1928 Gastón Suárez, dramaturgo y escritor boliviano.
1926 Ingrid Thulin, actriz, directora de cine y teatro sueca.
1921 Donna Reed, actriz estadounidense.
1918 Elmore James, guitarrista de blues estadounidense.
1910 Félix Candela, arquitecto e ingeniero español.
1903 John Carew Eccles, neurofisiólogo australiano, Premio Nobel de Fisiología o Medicina en 1963.
1900 Hyman Rickover, almirante estadounidense.
1893 Soong Ching-ling, esposa de Sun Yat-sen.
1891 Ilya Ehrenburg, escritor soviético.
1885 Jerome David Kern, compositor estadounidense.
1859 Guillermo II de Alemania
1850 John Collier, pintor prerrafaelita inglés.
1850 Samuel Gompers, dirigente obrero estadounidense.
1836 Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, escritor polaco.
1832 Lewis Carroll, lógico, matemático, fotógrafo y novelista británico.
1827 Ramón de Cala y Barea, político español.
1806 Juan Crisóstomo de Arriaga, compositor español.
1790 Juan N. Álvarez, militar mexicano.
1756 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, compositor austríaco.
1687 Johann Balthasar Neumann, arquitecto alemán.
1662 Richard Bentley, filólogo, helenista y cronólogo inglés.
1621 Thomas Willis, médico inglés.
1546 Joaquín-Federico I, Margrave Elector de Brandeburgo.
1443 Alberto III de Sajonia-Meissen, duque de Sajonia-Meissen.
Fallecimientos Notables en Enero 27 …

2010 Eduardo Michaelsen, pintor cubano (n. 1920).
2010 Fallece Sergio Nudelstejer. Académico, intelectual, escritor, crítico literario.
2010 Howard Zinn, historiador y activista político estadounidense (n. 1922).
2010 J. D. Salinger, escritor estadounidense (n. 1919).
2010 Zelda Rubinstein, actriz estadounidense (n. 1933).
2009 John Updike, escritor estadounidense (n. 1932).
2009 Pablo Porta, dirigente futbolístico español (n. 1923).
2008 Gordon Bitner Hinckley, religioso mormón estadounidense (n. 1910).
2008 Haji Mohammad Suharto, dictador y presidente indonesio (1967-1998) (n. 1921).
2008 Raúl Lozza, pintor argentino (n. 1911).
2007 Claudio Guillén, escritor y académico español.
2007 Paul Channon, político británico.
2007 Yelena Romanova, atleta rusa.
2002 Mari Carmen Prendes, actriz española.
1999 Gonzalo Torrente Ballester, escritor español.
1993 André el Gigante, luchador profesional francés.
1987 Norman McLaren, animador y director de cine escocés.
1983 Louis de Funès, actor francés.
1979 Victoria Ocampo, escritora y editora argentina.
1967 Gus Grissom, astronauta estadounidense.
1956 Erich Kleiber, director de orquesta austríaco.
1950 Augusto D’Halmar, poeta y escritor chileno.
1950 Henri Pittier, ingeniero, geógrafo, naturalista y botánico venezolano.
1901 Giuseppe Verdi, compositor italiano.
1881 Manuel Orozco y Berra, historiador mexicano.
1860 János Bolyai, matemático húngaro.
1844 Charles Nodier, escritor francés.
1554 Pedro de Heredia, navegante español, fundador de Cartagena de Indias (Colombia).
0098 Nerva, emperador romano.

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“La historia no se repite, pero rima” 
(Mark Twain)
 
“La historia se repite, primero como tragedia, después como farsa”
(Karl Marx)
  
“La historia es en realidad el registro de crímenes, locuras
y adversidades de la humanidad” 
(E.Gibbon)
 
“¿La historia se repite? – 
¿O se repite sólo como penitencia de quienes son incapaces de escucharla?”
(Eduardo Galeano)

 

 


Source: Associated Press  | history.com | news.bbc.co.uk  | Efemérides:  Por Juan Ramó7n Ortega Aguilera | istopiahistoria.blogspot.it | Hispanopolis  | WIKI | YouTube | Google 

 


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“La historia es en realidad el registro de crímenes, locuras y adversidades de la humanidad” (E. Gibbon)