Marzo 20 en la historia: | bambinoides.com

Marzo 20 en la historia:

US launches missiles against Saddam; American and British forces invade Iraq; LBJ sends federal troops to Alabama; U.S. soldiers charged in Abu Ghraib scandal; France’s Napoleon regains power; ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’; Sarin attack hits Tokyo subway; John Lennon marries Yoko Ono.

Hoy en la Historia – Today in History,

BBC’s In Context:

Written as if the event had only just occurred”

2003:

US launches missiles against Saddam

Baghdad with scene of explosion on horizon

Air strikes on Baghdad began at dawn

American missiles have hit the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, signalling the start of the US-led campaign to topple Saddam Hussein.President George Bush delivered a live television address shortly after the bombings began, vowing to “disarm Iraq and to free its people”.

The attack was ordered two hours after a final 48-hour deadline expired for Saddam Hussein to leave Iraq.

US sources say five key members of the Iraqi regime, including the Iraqi leader himself, were targeted in the first attacks.

We will bring freedom to others
President Bush

The Iraqis say some non-military targets have been hit and a number of civilians wounded in Doura, a southern suburb of the capital.The air strikes began at 0534 local time (0234 GMT). A short time later, Iraqi TV broadcast what it said was a live speech by Saddam Hussein.

In it he said: “I don’t need to remind you what you should do to defend our country.

“Let the unbelievers go to hell, you will be victorious, Iraqi people.”

President Bush played down hopes of an early victory.

In his broadcast to the American people he warned the campaign “could be longer and more difficult than some predict”.

He continued: “This will not be a campaign of half measures and we will accept no outcome but victory.”

“The dangers to our country and the world will be overcome. We will pass through this time of peril and carry on the work of peace. We will defend our freedom. We will bring freedom to others.”

At 2200 GMT British Prime Minister Tony Blair made a live televised address to the nation.

He confirmed British troops were in action in Iraq. He said their purpose was to remove Saddam Hussein and disarm Iraq of weapons of mass destruction.

The attack has drawn international condemnation and brought demonstrators onto the streets in several countries.

Attempts to get a United Nations Security Council resolution backing a military campaign in Iraq were abandoned earlier in the week when it became clear the US still faced an uphill battle to get the majority it needed.

The French had been pushing for more time to allow Iraq to disarm and today President Jacques Chirac of France expressed regret at the launch of hostilities without UN backing.

Russian President Vladimir Putin said the military action was entirely unjustified, while China said the strike violated the United Nations charter.

Anti-war demonstrations have taken place in cities in Greece, Egypt, Australia and Indonesia.

In Context

The Pentagon called the US air strike against Baghdad a “target of opportunity” – a chance to attack leadership targets in the hope of killing senior Iraqi commanders. It was not the launch of full-scale hostilities.The attack was carried out by F-117 Stealth fighters, but cruise missiles were also fired from four US navy warships and two submarines.

The following day (21 March) the US and British launched a massive aerial assault on Baghdad in what the US called its “shock and awe” strategy. At the same time, ground forces were advancing into southern Iraq.

Iraqi forces resisted the American-led coalition troops until 9 April when a giant statue of the Iraqi leader was toppled by demonstrators in Baghdad but the man himself escaped into hiding.

On 15 April a first meeting was held to talk about a new regime in Iraq.

The US formally handed over power to the Iraqis on 28 June 2004. Saddam Hussein was captured in December 2003, tried by an Iraqi court, sentenced to death and hanged on 30 December 2006.

.

Images from Today’s History:

 

Associated Press

History Channel

 

Abu Ghraib scandal_17

Abu Ghraib scandal_1

During the war in Iraq that began in March 2003, personnel of the United States Army and the Central Intelligence Agency committed a series of human rights violations against detainees in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.[1] These violations included physical and sexual abuse, torture, rape, sodomy, and murder.[2][3][4][5] The abuses came to light with reports published in late 2003 by Amnesty International and the Associated Press. The incidents received widespread condemnation both within the United States and abroad, although the soldiers received support from some conservative media within the United States.[6][7] The administration of George W. Bush attempted to portray the abuses as isolated incidents, not indicative of general U.S. policy. This was contradicted by humanitarian organizations such as the Red Cross, Amnesty International, and Human Rights Watch. After multiple investigations, these organizations stated that the abuses at Abu Ghraib were not isolated incidents, but were part of a wider pattern of torture and brutal treatment at American overseas detention centers, including those in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantanamo Bay. There was evidence that authorization for the torture had come from high up in the military hierarchy, with allegations being made that Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld had authorized some of the actions. The United States Department of Defense removed seventeen soldiers and officers from duty, and eleven soldiers were charged with dereliction of duty, maltreatment, aggravated assault and battery. Between May 2004 and March 2006, these soldiers were convicted in courts-martial, sentenced to military prison, and dishonorably discharged from service. Two soldiers, Specialists Charles Graner and Lynndie England, were sentenced to ten and three years in prison, respectively. Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, the commanding officer of all detention facilities in Iraq, was reprimanded and demoted to the rank of colonel. Several more military personnel who were accused of perpetrating or authorizing the measures, including many of higher rank, were not prosecuted. Documents popularly known as the Torture Memos came to light a few years later. These documents, prepared shortly before the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the United States Department of Justice, authorized certain enhanced interrogation techniques, generally held to involve torture of foreign detainees. The memoranda also argued that international humanitarian laws, such as the Geneva Conventions, did not apply to American interrogators overseas. Several subsequent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, including Hamdan v. Rumsfeld (2006), have overturned Bush administration policy, and ruled that Geneva Conventions apply.

Abu Ghraib scandal_4

ABU GRAIB SBS TELEVISION DATELINE...** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENTS ** This image, manipulated by the source with a black rectangle, is from video made available Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2006 by the Special Broadcasting System in Australia is said by the broadcaster to shows a prisoner being abused. The Australian television network said the images of prisoners were made at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad in late 2003, and were among photographs the American Civil Liberties Union was trying to obtain from the U.S. government under a Freedom of Information request. SBS refused to give details on the source of the photographs, and the authenticity of the images could not be verified independently. (AP Photo/SBS/Dateline)

U.S. soldiers charged in Abu Ghraib scandal

During the war in Iraq that began in March 2003, personnel of the United States Army and the Central Intelligence Agency committed a series of human rights violations against detainees in the Abu GhraibAbu Ghraib scandal_10 prison in Iraq. These violations included physical and sexual abuse, torture, rape, sodomy, and murder. The abuses came to light with reports published in late 2003 by Amnesty International and the Associated Press. The incidents received widespread condemnation both within the United States and abroad, although the soldiers received support from some conservative media within the United States.

Abu Ghraib scandal_12Abu Ghraib scandal_11The administration of George W. Bush attempted to portray the abuses as isolated incidents, not indicative of general U.S. policy. This was contradicted by humanitarian organizations such as the Red Cross, Amnesty International, and Human Rights Watch. After multiple investigations, these organizations stated that the abuses at Abu Ghraib were not isolated incidents, but were Abu Ghraib scandal_2part of a wider pattern of torture and brutal treatment at American overseas detention centers, including those in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantanamo Bay. There was evidence that authorization for the torture had come from high up in the military hierarchy, with allegations being made that Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld had authorized some of the actions.

The United States Department of Defense removed seventeen soldiers and officers from duty, and eleven soldiers were charged with dereliction of duty, maltreatment, aggravated assault and battery. Between May 2004 and March 2006, these soldiers were convicted in courts-martial, sentenced to military Abu Ghraib scandal_17prison, and dishonorably discharged from service. Two soldiers, Specialists Charles Graner and Lynndie England, were sentenced to ten and three years in prison, respectively. Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, the commanding officer of all detention facilities in Iraq, was reprimanded and demoted to the rank of colonel. Several more military personnel who were accused of perpetrating or authorizing the measures, including many of higher rank, were not prosecuted.

Documents popularly known as the Torture Memos came to light a few years later. These documents, prepared shortly before the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the United States Department of Justice, authorized certain enhanced interrogation techniques, generally held to involve torture of foreign detainees. The memoranda also argued that international humanitarian laws, such as the Geneva Conventions, did not apply to American interrogators overseas. Several subsequent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, including Hamdan v. Rumsfeld (2006), have overturned Bush administration policy, and ruled that Geneva Conventions apply.

.

This Day in History

History Channel

1965

LBJ sends federal troops to Alabama

Governor George Wallace Stands at the Door While Being Confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas

On this day in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson notifies Alabama’s Governor George Wallace that he will use federal authority to call up the Alabama National Guard in order to supervise a planned civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery.

Intimidation and discrimination had earlier prevented Selma’s black population–over half the city–from registering and voting. On Sunday, March 7, 1965, a group of 600 demonstrators marched on the capital city of Montgomery to protest this disenfranchisement and the earlier killing of a black man, Jimmie Lee Jackson, by a state trooper. In brutal scenes that were later broadcast on television, state and local police attacked the marchers with billy clubs and tear gas. TV viewers far and wide were outraged by the images, and a protest march was organized just two days after “Bloody Sunday” by Martin Luther King, Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). King turned the marchers around, however, rather than carry out the march without federal judicial approval.

After an Alabama federal judge ruled on March 18 that a third march could go ahead, President Johnson and his advisers worked quickly to find a way to ensure the safety of King and his demonstrators on their way from Selma to Montgomery. The most powerful obstacle in their way was Governor Wallace, an outspoken anti-integrationist who was reluctant to spend any state funds on protecting the demonstrators. Hours after promising Johnson–in telephone calls recorded by the White House–that he would call out the Alabama National Guard to maintain order, Wallace went on television and demanded that Johnson send in federal troops instead.

Furious, Johnson told Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to write a press release stating that because Wallace refused to use the 10,000 available guardsmen to preserve order in his state, Johnson himself was calling the guard up and giving them all necessary support. Several days later, 50,000 marchers followed King some 54 miles, under the watchful eyes of state and federal troops. Arriving safely in Montgomery on March 25, they watched King deliver his famous “How Long, Not Long” speech from the steps of the Capitol building. The clash between Johnson and Wallace–and Johnson’s decisive action–was an important turning point in the civil rights movement. Within five months, Congress had passed the Voting Rights Act, which Johnson proudly signed into law on August 6, 1965.

.

.

Hoy en la Historia del Mundo / Efemérides

 Istopia Historia:




1179 Alfonso VIII(imagen arriba dch) y Alfonso II (imagen arriba izq), reyes de Castilla y Aragón, respectivamente, firman el Tratado de Cazola, por el que ambos reinos se reparten las zonas de conquista en al-Ándalus: Valencia, Denia y Játiva para Aragón y el resto de territorios musulmanes para Castilla.

1254 Las aldeas de Calatayud lograron configurarse en Comunidad por privilegio de Jaime I, rey de Aragón.

1442 El rey Juan II hace entrega a Antequera (Málaga) de los castillos de Cauche, Aznalmara y Tébar.

1491 Alfonso de Chinchilla es nombrado, por Real Cédula, primer cónsul del puerto de Málaga.

1499 Vasco da Gama hace escala en el Cabo de Buena Esperanza en su viaje de vuelta de Calcuta.

1565 Felipe II, rey de España, encarga a Pedro Menéndez de Avilés la conquista y conversión a la fe católica de los indígenas de las provincias de la Florida.

1583 Juan de Garay (imagen dch) y 40 españoles más mueren a manos de los indígenas mientras dormían al raso, en su viaje hacia Santa Fe de la Vera Cruz (Argentina).

1600 En Linköping (Suecia) sucede el Baño de Sangre de Linköping  y Carlos IX de Suecia decapita a cinco opositores nobles.

1602 Se establece la Compañía Holandesa de las Indias Orientales.

1616 En Inglaterra, el rey Jacobo I libera a sir Walter Raleigh de la Torre de Londres luego de 13 años de prisión.

1761 En Filadelfia (EE. UU.) es elegido el primer alcalde, Humphrey Morrey.

1778 Por disposición de las autoridades realistas los territorios chilenos de Mendoza, San Juan y Tucumán son segregados del Reino de Chile e incorporados al Virreinato del Plata.

1779 El virrey Antonio María Bucareli inaugura el acueducto Chapultepec-Salto del Agua (México).

1786 En Suecia, el rey Gustavo III funda la Academia Sueca (ver Premio Nobel).

1800 En la llanura de Heliópolis (Egipto), los franceses dirigidos por Kleber (imagen izq) vencen a los turcos.

1807 Los británicos se apoderan de Alejandría tras la llegada del ejército de Napoleón a Egipto.

1814 En Venezuela, cerca de la población aragüeña de San Mateo se libra la Batalla de San Mateo. El general Simón Bolívar comanda las tropas que derrotan a los realistas encabezados por José Tomás Boves.

1814 En Chile se libra la batalla de Membrillar, donde las fuerzas chilenas de Juan Mackenna logran frenar temporalmente el avance del ejército realista de Gabino Gaínza rumbo a la capital chilena.

1815 En Francia, el emperador Napoleón Bonaparte regresa a París desde la isla de Elba con un ejército de 140.000 y 200.000 voluntarios; comienzan los Cien Días.

1821 En Portugal, el gobierno abole la Inquisición católica.

1823 En España, las Cortes españolas sin esperar el avance de las tropas francesas deciden su
traslado y el del rey desde Madrid a Sevilla y Cádiz, con la esperanza de que la presencia francesa provoque un generalizado movimiento de resistencia, semejante al de 1808.

1823 Se emite el “Primer Estatuto Político de la Provincia de Costa Rica”. Este estatuto desliga al país del Imperio Mexicano y establece una reestructuración del Gobierno.

1836 Se da la batalla de Golhiad (imagen dch), en Texas, entre las fuerzas mejicanas dirigidas por el general Jesús Urrea y las tejanas del general J. W. Fanning. Triunfan los mejicanos y hacen prisioneros a Fanning junto con trescientos soldados.

1848 Apuñalan por la espalda al político y periodista Florencio Varela, en Montevideo.

1852 En EE. UU., Harriet Beecher Stowe publica La cabaña del tío Tom, que supuso un gran apoyo a la causa de la emancipación de los negros.

1854 En la ciudad de Ripon (Wisconsin) se funda el Partido Republicano de Estados Unidos.

1856 En la Hacienda Santa Rosa (Costa Rica), el presidente Juan Rafael Mora Porras reúne a un grupo de militares costarricenses y echa del país al delincuente estadounidense William Walker y sus filibusteros.

1861 En la ciudad de Mendoza (Argentina) ocurre un terremoto que la destruye por completo.

1865 En Madrid, Emilio Castelar es expedientado por la autoría del artículo «El rasgo», publicado en el periódico La Democracia.

1873 La Asamblea Nacional republicana de España aprueba la abolición de la esclavitud en la isla de Puerto Rico.

1878 Tratado Salgar-Wyse, en virtud del cual Colombia cede a Lucien Napoleón Bonaparte Wyse (imagen izq) el privilegio de construir el canal de Panamá.

1882 En España comienzan las obras de reconstrucción del Alcázar de Segovia.

1888 En la antigua ciudadela de Barcelona, que ha sido convertida en un parque, la regente María Cristina inaugura la Exposición Universal.

1896 Los marines norteamericanos desembarcan en Nicaragua.

1899 Martha M. Place se convierte en la primera mujer en ser ajusticiada en la silla eléctrica.

1901 En el Teatro del Duque de Sevilla se estrena la obra de Pedro Muñoz Seca “Las Guerreras”, escrita en colaboración con el sevillano José Luis Montoto.

1902 En el Teatro Español de Madrid, tiene lugar una brillante ceremonia póstuma en honor del actor de Jerez de la Frontera (Cádiz) Antonio Vico.

1906 La isla de Ustica, al norte de Palermo (Sicilia) es devastada por un terremoto y una erupción volcánica.


1906 Segismundo Moret presenta su dimisión ante el rey en plena crisis del Gobierno español.(imagen dch)

1907 Oudjda (Marruecos) es ocupada por las tropas francesas.

1909 En Hamburgo se bota el crucero de guerra Von der Tann, que desplaza 17.000 t.

1912 En el Salón Imperial de Sevilla debuta con gran éxito la bailarina española Pastora Imperio.

1913 En Grecia, Constantino I es coronado rey.

1913 En el Galgenberg es descubierta una gran necrópolis con urnas de la Edad de Bronce.

1914 En Akita (Japón), un terremoto causa 93 muertos.

1915 En el observatorio de Barcelona, el astrónomo José Comas y Solá, descubre el asteroide 804, bautizado con el nombre de Hispania. Es el primer asteroide descubierto por científicos españoles.

1915 En Francia durante la Primera Guerra Mundial los zepelines alemanes bombardean París.

1918 Harlow Shapley (imagen izq) calcula, utilizando la telemetría fotométrica, que el Sol se encuentra a una distancia de 50.000 años-luz del centro de nuestra galaxia (la Vía Láctea).

1920 En Detroit la estación 8 MK emite las primeras noticias radiofónicas.

1921 En el centro de Alemania suceden graves levantamientos comunistas.

1925 Se inaugura el Hotel Sierra Nevada (o del Duque), promovido por el granadino Julio Quesada Cañaveral y Piédrola, con todas las comodidades del momento, siendo el primero de España en disponer de corriente eléctrica para todos sus servicios.

1926 En Cantón (China), Chiang Kai-shek da un golpe de Estado, con lo que se inicia la represión contra los comunistas.

1928 El gobernador civil de Barcelona prohíbe la entrada de jóvenes menores de 18 años en los salones de baile si no van acompañados por algún familiar.

1931 Consejo de guerra contra los dirigentes de la revuelta de Jaca (España). Una mujer, Victoria Kent, interviene por primera vez en un suceso de esta índole, como defensora de uno de los acusados.

1932 El dirigible alemán Graf Zeppelin inaugura sus vuelos regulares a América del Sur.

1933 En Florida (EE. UU.), el italiano Giuseppe Zangara es ejecutado en la silla eléctrica por asesinar a Anton Cermak en un intento de asesinato contra el presidente Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1933 Inaugurado en Dachau el primer campo de concentración nazi.(imagen dch)

1934 En Kiel (Alemania) tienen lugar las primeras pruebas con los aparatos de radar construidos por Rudolf Kunhold en 1933.

1936 En Castro Urdiales (Santander) se produce el asalto al Circulo Católico y al local de Falange.

1936 En La Coruña se produce el asalto al local de la Patronal y al local de Juventud Católica, muriendo en los incidentes un anarquista, por lo que encima convocan huelga general con varios heridos.

1942 Se suicida en la URSS José Díaz Ramos, político sevillano de ideología anarquista primero y comunista después, célebre por ser el diputado que amenazó de muerte públicamente a Calvo Sotelo en las Cortes, meses antes de su asesinato.

1942 En el marco del Holocausto, en la ciudad de Rohatyn (óblast de Ivano-Frankivsk, en el oeste de Ucrania), la SS alemana mata a 3000 judíos, incluidos 600 niños y niñas, aniquilando el 70% del ghetto de esa ciudad.

1942 En el marco de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, en Zgierz (Polonia), 100 polacos son sacados de un campo de concentración y fusilados por los nazis alemanes.

1943 El Gobierno polaco en el exilio informa del asesinato de judíos mientras se desalojaban los guetos.

1945 En el transcurso de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, la isla de Iwo Jima (imagen izq), defendida por japoneses, queda en poder de los estadounidenses tras un mes de lucha feroz, en el que murieron 20.000 soldados por cada bando.

1946 El Senado de Puerto Rico aprueba un proyecto de ley que restablece el uso del español como lengua oficial.

1948 En Estados Unidos, El limpiabotas (italófono) se convierte en el primer filme no anglófono ganador del Premio de la Academia.

1950 El Gobierno de Polonia decide confiscar los bienes del clero.

1952 La anulación de la ley de segregación racial por el Tribunal Supremo de Sudáfrica produce una grave crisis constitucional.

1956 Túnez se independiza de Francia.

1957 En Suiza, el Consejo Nacional concede el voto a la mujer.

1962 En Argentina el presidente Arturo Frondizi decreta la intervención federal de las provincias de Buenos Aires, Chaco, Río Negro, Santiago del Estero y Tucumán, en razón del triunfo en dichas jurisdicciones de partidarios del derrocado expresidente Juan Domingo Perón.

1964 El Consejo de Ministros español acuerda, por decreto, declarar el 1 de abril fiesta nacional abonable y no recuperable.


1966 En Inglaterra es robado el trofeo Jules Rimet (imagen dch), de la Copa Mundial de Fútbol, cuatro meses antes de su inicio, durante una exhibición pública en el Salón Central de Westminster. El trofeo fue encontrado sólo siete días después, envuelto en periódico al fondo del seto de un jardín suburbano en Upper Norwood (Londres), por un perro llamado Pickles.

1969 En Inglaterra se casan el músico beatle John Lennon y la música japonesa Yoko Ono.

1971 Dos muertos y más de 100 heridos en un accidente ocurrido en Valencia durante las Fallas.

1974 Fuera del Palacio de Buckingham (en Londres), un tal Ian Ball intenta infructuosamente de secuestrar a la princesa Anne y su marido, el capitán Mark Phillips.

1977 En la India, la oposición gana las elecciones legislativas e Indira Gandhi dimite.

1980 En México, la cúpula del grupo guerrillero argentino Montoneros se divide y funda «Montoneros-17 de octubre»: Eduardo Astiz, Gerardo Bavio, Sylvia Bermann, Miguel Bonasso, René Cháves, Jaime Dri, Ernesto Jauretche, Pedro Orgambide, Julio Rodríguez Anido, Susana Sanz y Daniel Vaca Narvaja. Denuncian que Montoneros tiene un «complejo clausewitziano», que cree que la lucha social es una guerra entre dos fuerzas militares convencionales.

1980 La coalición nacionalista Convergencia i Unió (CiU) gana las elecciones al Parlamento de Cataluña.

1983 Manifestación anti-OTAN en Madrid.

1985 El presidente argentino, Raúl Alfonsín,(imagen izq) niega su apoyo a la política de fuerza sobre Centroamérica del presidente Reagan, en su intervención ante el Congreso de los EEUU.

1985 Tras 13 días de huelga general en Bolivia, las fuerzas militares y policiales asumen el control de La Paz.

1987 La FDA (Food and Drug Administration: Administración de Medicamentos y Alimentos) aprueba la AZT (droga contra el sida).

1987 Reingresan en el Ejército español los nueve militares expulsados en 1975 por pertenecer a la Unión Militar Democrática.

1988 El partido ultraderechista ARENA (Alianza Republicana Nacionalista), encabezado por Alfredo Cristiani, vence en las elecciones legislativas y municipales celebradas en El Salvador.

1990 En Filipinas, la ex primera dama Imelda Marcos (viuda del dictador Ferdinand Marcos), es enjuiciada por los delitos de soborno y mal uso de los fondos del gobierno.

1990 Namibia se convierte en Estado soberano tras 75 años de colonización.

1992 El piloto estadounidense Kenny Bernstein superó por primera vez las 300 mph (482,803 km/h) en la línea de meta de una carrera de arrancones de cuarto de milla en la fecha de Gainesville de la National Hot Rod Association.


1993 En Rusia, el presidente Borís Yeltsin (imagen dch) disuelve el Parlamento y asume poderes especiales, medidas declaradas inconstitucionales tres días después.

1994 Zine el Abidine es reelegido presidente de Túnez. La Agrupación Constitucional Democrática gana las primeras elecciones parlamentarias celebradas en este país.

1994 La Alianza Republicana Nacionalista (ARENA) vence en las elecciones generales celebradas en El Salvador.

1995 El periódico “Deia” informa de la aparición de los cadáveres de Lasa y Zabala en Alicante.

1995 En Tokio (Japón), miembros de la secta religiosa Aum Shinrikyo liberan gas sarín en cinco estaciones de metro, matando a 13 personas e hiriendo 5510 (Atentado en el Metro de Tokio).

1996 El Congreso colombiano aprueba la ley que autoriza el juicio parlamentario a Samper por el narcoescándalo.

1996 Muere una monja española en Ruanda al estallar una mina.

1997 La Justicia española condena a Mario Conde, ex presidente de Banesto, a seis años de cárcel por apropiación indebida y falsedad de documento mercantil, en relación con el «caso Argentia Trust».

1998 La Guardia Civil desarticula el comando “Araba” tras cuatro meses de investigación.(imagen izq)

2000 El programa europeo Levántate y anda, encaminado a devolver la movilidad a parapléjicos, presenta sus primeros resultados con una demostración pública en la que tres minusválidos, a los que se les había implantado un mecanismo de electroestimulación, ponen en movimiento sus miembros.

2001 La mayor plataforma petrolera mundial, la P-36 brasileña, con una extensión equivalente a un campo de fútbol y una altura de 100 metros, se hunde frente a las costas de Río de Janeiro.

2001 España pide a Francia que dedique más policías y medios materiales a la lucha contra la banda asesina ETA.
2001 Un español, único superviviente de un accidente aéreo en Angola con 16 muertos.

2001 La banda terrorista ETA asesina en Lasarte (España) a un concejal socialista.

2002 La Reina Sofía preside el acto oficial de la inauguración del “Año Gaudí”.

2003 Una flota de tres barcos y 900 militares españoles parte hacia Irak en misión de apoyo sanitario a las tropas anglo-americanas.

2003 Una coalición de países, liderados por Estados Unidos, invade Irak y se de inicio a la Guerra de Irak, que durará hasta el año 2011.


2004 Centenares de miles de personas se manifiestan en las calles de las principales ciudades del mundo para rechazar la ocupación de Irak, al cumplirse un año del inicio de la guerra. (imagen dch)

2005 La ciudad de Fukuoka (Japón) es sacudida por un terremoto grado 6,6. Es su mayor sismo en un siglo. Muere una persona y cientos son heridos y evacuados.

2006 En el este de Australia el huracán Larry toca tierra, destruyendo la mayor parte de la cosecha de banana del país.

2007 El presidente de Ecuador, Rafael Correa, forma un Congreso Nacional a su medida, gracias a la legitimación de 21 diputados suplentes para desbancar a los opositores a la reforma constitucional.

2007 Irak ahorca (en el aniversario de la invasión del país) al que fuera su vicepresidente, Taha Yasín Ramadán, que fue condenado a muerte por la misma matanza que Sadam Husein.(imagen izq)

2012 En México, un terremoto de 7.9 grados en la escala sismológica de Richter sacude a los estados de Guerrero, Michoacán, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Puebla, Tlaxcala, Hidalgo, Morelos, Veracruz, Estado de México y Ciudad de México, dejando diversos daños materiales y dos víctimas.

2013 Lanzamiento de Ouya.

.

 Hispanópolis:

Marzo 20 en la Historia del Mundo …
2006 En Chile, se inicia la Cuarta temporada de Cabra Chica Gritona.
2003 EEUU invade Iraq.
1956 Tunicia alcanza la independencia de Francia.
1916 Albert Einstein publicó su teoría general de la relatividad
1854 Es fundado el Partido Republicano de los Estados Unidos en una reunión celebrada en la ciudad de Ripon en el Estado de Wisconsin.
1815 Regresa el emperador francés Napoleón Bonaparte a París desde la isla de Elba a gobernar por los Cien Días.
1814 Batalla de San Mateo, de la época de independencia de Venezuela. El Libertador, Simón Bolívar comanda las tropas patriotas que derrotan a las realistas encabezadas por José Tomás Boves cerca de la población aragüeña del mismo nombre.
1814 Combate del Membrillar, entre las fuerzas realistas de Gabino Gaínza y las patriotas de Juan Mackenna, en el que estas últimas logran frenar temporalmente el avance del ejército realista rumbo a la capital chilena.
1602 Establecen Compañía Holandesa de las Indias Orientales.
Nacimientos Notables en Marzo 20 …
0043 B.C. Ovidio, poeta romano.
1987 Emilia Attias, modelo argentina.
1984 Fernando Torres, futbolista español.
1982 Nick Wheeler, guitarrista estadounidense (The All-American Rejects).
1979 Silvia Abascal, actriz española.
1976 Chester Bennington, músico estadounidense (Linkin Park).
1972 Alex Kapranos, vocalista de Franz Ferdinand.
1969 Mannie Fresh, productor musical de Cash Money Records.
1964 Tracy Chapman, cantautora estadounidense.
1963 Yelena Romanova, atleta rusa.
1962 Stephen Sommers, director y guionista estadounidense.
1961 Slim Jim Phantom, baterista estadounidense de Stray Cats.
1958 Holly Hunter, actriz estadounidense.
1958 Phil Anderson, ciclista australiano.
1957 Spike Lee, director de cine estadounidense.
1955 Ana Obregón, actriz española.
1953 Alicia Kozameh, escritora argentina.
1951 Jimmie Vaughan, guitarrista de blues estadounidense.
1950 Carl Palmer, músico británico (Emerson, Lake & Palmer).
1950 William Hurt, actor estadounidense.
1947 John Boswell, historiador estadounidense.
1945 Pat Riley, entrenador de baloncesto de la NBA.
1943 Jaime Chávarri, director actor y guionista de cine español.
1939 Brian Mulroney, político canadiense.
1937 Lina Morgan, actriz española.
1922 Carl Reiner, director de cine estadounidense.
1918 Bernd Alois Zimmermann, compositor alemán.
1911 Alfonso García Robles, diplomático mexicano, premio Nobel de la Paz en 1982.
1904 Burrhus Frederic Skinner, psicólogo estadounidense.
1895 Fredric Wertham, psiquiatra germano-estadounidense.
1894 Hans Langsdorff, militar naval alemán.
1890 Beniamino Gigli, tenor italiano.
1870 Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, militar alemán.
1856 Frederick Winslow Taylor, ingeniero y economista estadounidense.
1828 Henrik Ibsen, dramaturgo noruego.
1811 Napoleón II de Francia, hijo de Napoleón Bonaparte
1791 José María de Torrijos y Uriarte, militar español.
1770 Friedrich Hölderlin, poeta alemán.
1725 Abd-ul-Hamid I, sultán del Imperio Otomano.
1678 Antoni Viladomat i Manalt, pintor barroco catalán.
Fallecimientos Notables en Marzo 20 …
2009 Abdellatif Filali, político y primer ministro marroquí entre 1994 y 1998 (n. 1928).
2009 Ángel Puigmiquel, historietista español (n. 1922).
2004 Reina Juliana de Holanda.
1997 Tony Zale, boxeador estadounidense.
1993 Polykarp Kusch, físico nacido en Alemania, Premio Nobel de Física en 1955.
1992 George Delerue, compositor francés.
1990 Lev Yashin, futbolista soviético.
1972 Marilyn Maxwell, actriz estadounidense.
1968 Antonio Riquelme, actor español.
1968 Carl Theodor Dreyer, director de cine danés.
1964 Brendan Behan, escritor irlandés.
1931 Hermann Müller, canciller de Alemania.
1929 Ferdinand Foch, militar francés de la Primera Guerra Mundial.
1916 Ota Benga, el Pigmeo del Congo, traído a EEUU.
1894 Lajos Kossuth, político húngaro.
1727 Isaac Newton, físico británico.
1413 Enrique IV, rey de Inglaterra (1399-1413).
.

.

History Channel: 

“Also on this Day”

  • Lead Story

  • 1965 LBJ sends federal troops to Alabama
  • American Revolution

  • 1778 King Louis XVI receives U.S. representatives
  • Automotive

  • 1928 Auto pioneer James Packard dies
  • Civil War

  • 1861 Willie and Tad Lincoln get the measles
  • Cold War

  • 1953 Khrushchev begins his rise to power
  • Crime

  • 1995 Tokyo subways are attacked with sarin gas
  • Disaster

  • 1345 Black Death is created, allegedly
  • General Interest

  • 1413 Henry V ascends upon father’s death
  • 1854 Republican Party founded
  • 1995 Nerve gas attack on Tokyo subway
  • Hollywood

  • 1948 20th annual Academy Awards celebrated
  • Literary

  • 1852 Uncle Tom’s Cabin is published
  • Music

  • 1982 Joan Jett tops the pop charts with “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll”
  • Old West

  • 1823 Ned Buntline born
  • Presidential

  • 1965 LBJ pledges federal troops to Alabama civil-rights march
  • Sports

  • 1934 Babe Didrikson goes to the mound for Philly
  • Vietnam War

  • 1954 Americans alarmed about impending French defeat
  • 1968 Retired Marine Commandant comments on conduct of war
  • World War I

  • 1915 Britain and Russia divide future spoils of war
  • World War II

  • 1945 British troops liberate Mandalay, Burma
.

.


 El Calendario: Hoy en la Historia


Source: Associated Press | hispanopolis.com | history.com | news.bbc.co.uk  | Efemérides:  Por Juan Ramón Ortega Aguilera | istopiahistoria.blogspot.it | WIKI | YouTube | Google 

.

(Media - Bambinoides)


The views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher or bambinoides.com. Images accompanying posts are either owned by the author of said post or are in the public domain and included by the publisher of the blog bambinoides.com on its initiative.

Leave a comment

You must be Logged in to post comment.

WP-Backgrounds Lite by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann 1010 Wien
Confrontando la información, - el pasado y el presente...
"Estudia el pasado si quieres pronosticar el futuro". (Confucio)