Marzo 07 en la historia: | bambinoides.com
Lunes 6 Marzo, 2017 19:45

Marzo 07 en la historia:

Civil rights marchers attacked in Selma, Alabama; Nazi Germany’s dictator Adolf Hitler sends troops into the demilitarized Rhineland; Movie director Stanley Kubrick dies.

Today in History, Hoy en la Historia

BBC’s In Context:

Written as if the event had only just occurred”

1965:

Police attack Alabama marchers

State trooper attacks black man - Selma, 1965

State troopers beat demonstrators seeking voting rights for blacks

State troopers and volunteer officers in the southern US state of Alabama have broken up a demonstration of black and white civil rights protesters, injuring at least 50 people.They assaulted a group of about 500 demonstrators using tear gas, whips and sticks after Governor George Wallace ordered the planned march from Selma to the state capital Montgomery to be halted on the grounds of public safety.

At least 10 of the injured have been taken to hospital with skull and limb fractures and suffering the effects of tear gas.

They were stopped by 200 police this morning at the Edmund Pettus Bridge as they were heading east out of Selma on US Route 80.

Next time we march we may have to keep going when we get to Montgomery. We may have to on to Washington
John Lewis, march organiser

When they refused to turn back the state troopers, some on horseback, attacked in full view of photographers and journalists.As they were pushed back to the Browns Chapel Methodist Church area, some protesters threw bricks and bottles at police but were chased into their homes by troopers wielding sticks, riot guns, pistols and tear gas bombs.

The streets were patrolled for an hour after the violence had subsided.

Among the injured was John Lewis, the chairman of the Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee (SNCC), who along with Hosea Williams, led the silent marchers from the Browns Chapel Church towards the outskirts of town.

He told the New York Times: “Next time we march we may have to keep going when we get to Montgomery. We may have to on to Washington.”

One of the doctors at Selma’s Good Samaritan Hospital said it looked as if there had been “a moderate disaster”.

Another hospital official said most of the injuries had been sustained by heavy blows.

FBI agents will be interviewing the wounded and other witnesses tomorrow to establish if there are grounds for legal action against the officers involved.

The protest march had been planned to highlight discriminatory practices in the state that prevented black people from registering to vote.

It was also meant to commemorate the death on 17 February of Jimmie Lee Jackson who was shot by a state trooper on a civil rights march in Selma.

There is widespread outrage at events in the city.

Congressman William Ryan of New York said the Federal Government should send marshals, or even troops down to Alabama to protect the marchers.

But Governor Wallace remains steadfast in his views saying: “These folks in Selma have made this a seven-day-a-week job but we can’t give one inch. We’re going to enforce state laws.”

In Context

Since 1963 Selma had been the focus of civil rights activists attempting to register black voters in Dallas County, Alabama.Demonstrations in January and February 1965 tried to highlight violations of existing voting rights laws. On the orders of Sheriff James Clark and with the support of Governor George Wallace, the protests were forcefully broken up – resulting in the death of activist Jimmy Lee Jackson.

The violent scenes in Selma on 7 March, which left 17 people in hospital, came to be known as Bloody Sunday.

Civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King organised another march there two days later. His group knelt and prayed in front of state troopers who stopped them at the Edmund Pettus Bridge but did not attack them.

Dr King filed a federal lawsuit for the right to march on Montgomery and on 21 March began the third and final march under the protection of federal troops. He and his supporters arrived a week later and held a rally attended by thousands.

President Lyndon B Johnson finally signed a new Voting Rights Act in August 1965 that banned discrimination in voting practices and procedures on the grounds of race or colour.

.

Images from Today’s History:

 

Associated Press

History Channel

 

Civil rights marchers attacked in Selma, Alabama

Between 1961 and 1964, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) had led a voting registration campaign in Selma, the seat of Dallas County, Alabama, a small town with a record of consistent resistance to black voting. When SNCC’s efforts were frustrated by stiff resistance from the county law enforcement officials, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) were persuaded by local activists to make Selma’s intransigence to black voting a national concern. SCLC also hoped to use the momentum of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to win federal protection for a voting rights statute.
Between 1961 and 1964, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) had led a voting registration campaign in Selma, the seat of Dallas County, Alabama, a small town with a record of consistent resistance to black voting. When SNCC’s efforts were frustrated by stiff resistance from the county law enforcement officials, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) were persuaded by local activists to make Selma’s intransigence to black voting a national concern. SCLC also hoped to use the momentum of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to win federal protection for a voting rights statute. During January and February, 1965, King and SCLC led a series of demonstrations to the Dallas County Courthouse. On February 17, protester Jimmy Lee Jackson was fatally shot by an Alabama state trooper. In response, a protest march from Selma to Montgomery was scheduled for March 7. Six hundred marchers assembled in Selma on Sunday, March 7, and, led by John Lewis and other SNCC and SCLC activists, crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River en route to Montgomery. Just short of the bridge, they found their way blocked by Alabama State troopers and local police who ordered them to turn around. When the protesters refused, the officers shot teargas and waded into the crowd, beating the nonviolent protesters with billy clubs and ultimately hospitalizing over fifty people. “Bloody Sunday” was televised around the world. Martin Luther King called for civil rights supporters to come to Selma for a second march. When members of Congress pressured him to restrain the march until a court could rule on whether the protesters deserved federal protection, King found himself torn between their requests for patience and demands of the movement activists pouring into Selma. King, still conflicted, led the second protest on March 9 but turned it around at the same bridge. King’s actions exacerbated the tension between SCLC and the more militant SNCC, who were pushing for more radical tactics that would move from nonviolent protest to win reforms to active opposition to racist institutions. On March 21, the final successful march began with federal protection, and on August 6, 1965, the federal Voting Rights Act was passed, completing the process that King had hoped for. Yet Bloody Sunday was about more than winning a federal act; it highlighted the political pressures King was negotiating at the time, between movement radicalism and federal calls for restraint, as well as the tensions between SCLC and SNCC.
During January and February, 1965, King and SCLC led a series of demonstrations to the Dallas County Courthouse. On February 17, protester Jimmy Lee Jackson was fatally shot by an Alabama state trooper. In response, a protest march from Selma to Montgomery was scheduled for March 7. Six hundred marchers assembled in Selma on Sunday, March 7, and, led by John Lewis and other SNCC and SCLC activists, crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River en route to Montgomery. Just short of the bridge, they found their way blocked by Alabama State troopers and local police who ordered them to turn around. When the protesters refused, the officers shot teargas and waded into the crowd, beating the nonviolent protesters with billy clubs and ultimately hospitalizing over fifty people. “Bloody Sunday” was televised around the world. Martin Luther King called for civil rights supporters to come to Selma for a second march. When members of Congress pressured him to restrain the march until a court could rule on whether the protesters deserved federal protection, King found himself torn between their requests for patience and demands of the movement activists pouring into Selma. King, still conflicted, led the second protest on March 9 but turned it around at the same bridge. King’s actions exacerbated the tension between SCLC and the more militant SNCC, who were pushing for more radical tactics that would move from nonviolent protest to win reforms to active opposition to racist institutions. On March 21, the final successful march began with federal protection, and on August 6, 1965, the federal Voting Rights Act was passed, completing the process that King had hoped for. Yet Bloody Sunday was about more than winning a federal act; it highlighted the political pressures King was negotiating at the time, between movement radicalism and federal calls for restraint, as well as the tensions between SCLC and SNCC.
.

.

This Day in History

History Channel

Lead Story:

1876

Alexander Graham Bell patents the telephone

On this day in 1876, 29-year-old Alexander Graham Bell receives a patent for his revolutionary new invention–the telephone.

The Scottish-born Bell worked in London with his father, Melville Bell, who developed Visible Speech, a written system used to teach speaking to the deaf. In the 1870s, the Bells moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where the younger Bell found work as a teacher at the Pemberton Avenue School for the Deaf. He later married one of his students, Mabel Hubbard.

While in Boston, Bell became very interested in the possibility of transmitting speech over wires. Samuel F.B. Morse’s invention of the telegraph in 1843 had made nearly instantaneous communication possible between two distant points. The drawback of the telegraph, however, was that it still required hand-delivery of messages between telegraph stations and recipients, and only one message could be transmitted at a time. Bell wanted to improve on this by creating a “harmonic telegraph,” a device that combined aspects of the telegraph and record player to allow individuals to speak to each other from a distance.

With the help of Thomas A. Watson, a Boston machine shop employee, Bell developed a prototype. In this first telephone, sound waves caused an electric current to vary in intensity and frequency, causing a thin, soft iron plate–called the diaphragm–to vibrate. These vibrations were transferred magnetically to another wire connected to a diaphragm in another, distant instrument. When that diaphragm vibrated, the original sound would be replicated in the ear of the receiving instrument. Three days after filing the patent, the telephone carried its first intelligible message–the famous “Mr. Watson, come here, I need you”–from Bell to his assistant.

Bell’s patent filing beat a similar claim by Elisha Gray by only two hours. Not wanting to be shut out of the communications market, Western Union Telegraph Company employed Gray and fellow inventor Thomas A. Edison to develop their own telephone technology. Bell sued, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which upheld Bell’s patent rights. In the years to come, the Bell Company withstood repeated legal challenges to emerge as the massive American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T) and form the foundation of the modern telecommunications industry.

.

.

Hoy en la Historia del Mundo / Efemérides

 Istopia Historia:


321 El emperador romano Constantino declara el domingo («venerable día del Sol») como séptimo día de la semana, en lugar del sábado.

1096 Nace en Córdoba Ubayd Allah Ibn Hisham al-Hadrami, literato y poeta.

1500 El ejército cristiano mandado por el Rey Católico ataca el castillo de Lanjarón (Granada), situado sobre una peña y defendido por 3000 musulmanes sublevados.

1541 Pedro de Valdivia instituye el Primer Cabildo de Santiago, considerado como la primera institución que tuvo Chile.


1779 Primer sorteo de la lotería realizado en Chile.

1793 La Convención Nacional francesa declara la guerra a España.

1803 El Rey de España Carlos IV nombra al Príncipe de la Paz y Generalísimo, Manuel Godoy (imagen dch), Director y Coronel-General del Real Cuerpo de Artillería.

1810 Las tropas de ocupación francesas crean en Málaga un Regimiento de Milicia Cívica para tratar de contener a los guerrilleros patriotas.

1814 En Chile, Antonio José de Irisarri asume como primer Director Supremo.

1815 En Ario, Michoacán, México, se lleva a cabo la instalación del Supremo Tribunal de Justicia, antecedente histórico de la Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación.

1822 Ante la negativa de los gobernadores españoles de las Californias (la alta y la baja) de no reconocer la Independencia de México, José María Mata y el alcalde de Loreto, aprovechan el ataque del filibustero inglés Thomas Cochrane a San José del Cabo, y organizan la resistencia, logrando vencer.

1827 En Argentina se enfrentaron las fuerzas del Imperio del Brasil comandadas por el Capitán James Shepherd con la guarnición del Fuerte del Carmen, comandado en ese momento por el Coronel Martín Lacarra, en lo que se dio en llamar: “El Combate de Patagones”. El escenario de los hechos fue el Cerro de la Caballada.

1835 En Argentina comienza el segundo gobierno de Juan Manuel de Rosas.

1836 En la guerra de México contra Texas, el general López de Santa Anna toma el fuerte de El Álamo, Texas. (imagen izq)
Santa Anna ordena fusilar a todos los sobrevivientes.

1849 José Hilario López, candidato radical, es nombrado presidente del Gobierno de Colombia.

1861 Pruebas satisfactorias del submarino de Monturiol “Ictineo” en aguas de Alicante. No
obstante, el inventor no consiguió apoyo oficial.

1876 En Estados Unidos, Alexander Graham Bell patenta el teléfono, basado en diseños del italiano Antonio Meucci.

1884 Creación de la diócesis de Madrid-Alcalá, por bula del Papa León XIII.

1885 Fusilamiento en Cuba del general Ramón Leocadio Bonachea, que se había incorporado a las tropas insurrectas al estallar la guerra independentista.

1885 Estreno de La vida alegre y muerte triste, del dramaturgo José de Echegaray.

1898 Asesinato del presidente de Guatemala, José María Reina Barrios.

1902 En Tweebosch (Transvaal) en el marco de las Guerras de los Bóer los afrikáneres  (imagen dch) vencen a los británicos, capturan a su general y a 200 de sus hombres.

1904 Manifestación de mujeres en Valladolid pidiendo “pan y trabajo”; hay enfrentamientos con la Guardia Civil y se producen varios heridos.

1905 En Rusia, los campesinos queman los castillos de sus opresores.

1906 Se celebra en San Sebastián la ceremonia de conversión al catolicismo de la princesa Victoria Eugenia de Battenberg, que se casaría con el rey Alfonso XIII.

1911 En México finaliza la revolución.

1913 En Mápula, Chihuahua, México muere asesinado el político y gobernador de aquel Estado, Abraham González Casavantes.

1922 Presentación en el Teatro Real, de Madrid, del tenor Miguel Fleta, que obtuvo un gran éxito con la ópera “Carmen”.

1924 Karl Wilhelm Reinmuth descubre el asteroide Arcadia (1020).(imagen izq)

1924 Se apruebada en Uruguay un proyecto de ley que impone el trabajo individual colectivo obligatorio.

1927 El gobernador civil de Barcelona prohíbe las audiciones de sardanas en sitios céntricos de la ciudad.

1928 Primera expedición postal aérea Madrid-Barcelona.

1934 El autogiro “La Cierva”, tripulado por su inventor, Juan de la Cierva, realiza pruebas de descenso y despegue satisfactorias en la cubierta del portaaviones “Dédalo”, en aguas de Valencia.

1934 Herido gravísimamente el falangista gijonés Fernando Cienfuegos por vender la revista FE.

1935 En Barcelona José Antonio pronuncia una conferencia en la sede inaugurada en la calle Rosich,3 (cerca de la iglesia de Santa María del Mar). Un conjunto de izquierdistas y separatistas cortan la luz e intentan asaltar el local con varios disparos.

1935 En Barcelona durante el entierro de Juan Ferrer Álvarez, secretario del Centro Autonomista de Dependientes de Comercio, y procesado por los hechos de octubre, pese a la oposición de su familia, su última voluntad y a la fuerza, miembros de Estat Catalá y BOC entran en la capilla ardiente, arrancan el crucifijo, adornan el local con banderas separatistas y hoces y martillos soviéticos, y se llevan el cadáver para convertir el entierro en un acto político y sin familia.

1936 Un miembro del sindicato estudiantil de Falange (SEU) muere por los disparos producidos días atrás por la policía en un acto del SEU.(imagen dch)

1936 En Puebla de Almoradiel (Toledo) el alcalde ha prohibido el entierro católico de Miguel Sepúlveda (ver día 6), asesinado el día anterior, y cuando los falangistas van a casa del alcalde a pedir el permiso, son tiroteados, muriendo los falangista Ramón Perea y Tomás Villanueva, resultando
heridas siete personas.

1936 La Wehrmacht entra a la Renania desmilitarizada.

1936 En Niebla (Huelva) es incendiada la iglesia parroquial del siglo XI.

1937 Sale el primer número del diario “Sur”, tras la incautación por miembros de Falange de “El Popular”, de larga tradición republicana.

1937 El sacerdote Manuel Vílchez Montalvo, nacido en Moreda (Granada), es asesinado por milicianos republicanos en Granada.

1938 Durante la Guerra Civil Española, se produce el hundimiento del crucero Baleares, donde mueren 788 personas.

1938 Se estrena en Barcelona la película “La casta Susana”, uno de los pocos filmes estrenados en época de guerra.

1939 Miaja y Casado envían emisarios a Franco ofreciendo la rendición.(imagen izq)

1939 Rebelión comunista en Madrid contra la Junta de Defensa, que dura cinco días y origina la muerte de unas tres mil personas.

1939 En el marco de la Guerra Civil Española, se produce el hundimiento por parte de las defensas costeras de Cartagena, del buque mercante, utilizado como transporte de tropas Castillo de Olite, convirtiéndose en el hundimiento de un solo buque con más víctimas mortales de la historia de España; 1476 fallecidos.

1947 En Medellín (Colombia) se funda la Corporación Deportiva Club Atlético Nacional.

1947 Sublevación de guarniciones militares en Paraguay, que dura hasta septiembre de este mismo año, con el propósito de derribar al Gobierno.

1955 En el Sitio de pruebas de Nevada, Estados Unidos detona su bomba atómica Turk, de 43 kton, la cuarta de las 14 de la operación Teapot. Es la bomba n.º 55 de las 1127 que Estados Unidos detonó entre 1945 y 1992.

1956 El gobierno de Aramburu (imagen dch) anuncia que continúa vigente la prohibición de la instrucción religiosa en las escuelas públicas de Argentina.

1957 Las fuerzas policiales controlan un intento de huelga en la minería asturiana promovido por los comunistas.

1958 En Buenos Aires (Argentina) se funda la Universidad Católica Argentina (UCA).

1966 En España, el ministro Manuel Fraga se baña en la playa de Palomares, donde cayó una
Bomba H estadounidense, para demostrar que no existe peligro de radioactividad.

1967 En Estados Unidos, el sindicalista Jimmy Hoffa empieza su sentencia de ocho años por intentar sobornar a un jurado.

1971 El guardia civil Dionisio Medina Serrano, natural de Priego de Córdoba, muere a consecuencia de la explosión de una bomba colocada en Barcelona por la banda criminal Front D’Alliberament Catalá, primera víctima del terrorismo en Cataluña.

1971 Es asesinado Melchor Ortega, ex presidente del Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) de México.

1972 En España, el cardenal Vicente Enrique y Tarancón  (imagen izq) es nombrado presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal Española.

1974 Camilo José Cela retira su candidatura al Ateneo de Madrid.

1978 Roto el consenso sobre la Constitución española. El PSOE abandona la ponencia.

1980 Nacionalizada la banca privada salvadoreña.

1985 Asesinado por la banda terrorista ETA el máximo responsable de la policía autónoma vasca, el teniente coronel Díaz Arcocha.

1986 Estreno de la película Matador, de Pedro Almodóvar.

1987 José Manuel Abascal logra la medalla de plata en los 1.500 metros lisos del Mundial de Atletismo en Sala celebrado en Indianápolis (EE.UU.).

1989 Irán rompe relaciones diplomáticas con Gran Bretaña debido a la novela de Salman Rushdie Versos satánicos.

1991 En España, el Congreso aprueba la creación del Instituto Cervantes.

1992 Sale al aire por primera vez el primer capítulo de la existosa serie de Anime, Sailor Moon.(imagen dch)

1992 El film de Vicente Aranda “Amantes” obtiene los dos principales Premios Goya 1992 como mejor película y mejor dirección.

1993 La Bolsa española cayó un 23% en el pasado año 1992.

1993 Los obispos españoles condenan la eutanasia.

1994 Condena de seis años a Bertrán de Caralt por delito fiscal.

1995 La audiencia nacional deja libres a Alvarez y Planchuelo, pero no a Sancristobal.

1996 Palestina elige su primer parlamento democráticamente.

1999 En El Salvador, Francisco Flores, candidato presidencial del partido oficial, ARENA, derrota con el 52% de los votos en las elecciones presidenciales celebradas en ese mismo día a Facundo Guardado, candidato presidencial del partido de oposición FMLN.

1997 HB fracasa en su intento de paralizar las Vascongadas y Navarra con la huelga.(imagen izq)

1997 El Rey de España, el presidente de México, Ernesto Zedillo, y los Premios Nobel Gabriel García Márquez, Camilo José Cela y Octavio Paz inauguran en Zacatecas (México) el I Congreso Internacional de la Lengua Española.

1998 El fiscal del Tribunal Supremo rechaza que el secuestro de Segundo Marey por los GAL haya prescrito.

1999 José Borrell asegura que Piqué o estafó a Ercros, empresa que dirigía o evadió impuestos.

2000 En Chile, el juez Guzmán pide el levantamiento de la inmunidad de Pinochet.

2000 Un coche bomba explota al paso de un vehículo de la Guardia Civil y hiere a ocho personas, cerca de Intxaurrondo.

2001 Baltasar Garzón detiene a quince dirigentes de Haika acusados de pertenecer a eta.

2001 Un juez anula leyes que amnistiaron a los militares argentinos.

2003 La madre del jefe de la Policía Municipal de Andoain (Guipúzcoa) asesinado, reta a xabier arzalluz que le diga a la cara en televisión que la manipulan.(imagen dch)

2005 Mueren más de 130 presos en el incendio de un cárcel dominicana.

2008 En la localidad guipuzcoana de Mondragón, el ex concejal socialista Isaías Carrasco es asesinado en la puerta de su casa por la banda terrorista ETA.

2010 En Irak se celebran elecciones para elegir el Consejo de Representantes (Parlamento iraquí); indirectamente se elige al Presidente y al Primer Ministro del país, ya que ambos deben ser elegidos por mayoría del nuevo Parlamento. Fueron las segundas elecciones parlamentarias bajo la nueva Constitución, decisivas para el futuro del país.

.

 Hispanópolis:

 

Marzo 7 en la Historia del Mundo …

2009 Se produce un atentado en un cuartel de Irlanda del Norte, reivindicado por el grupo paramilitar IRA Auténtico, con el resultado de dos soldados muertos y cuatro personas heridas, dos soldados y dos civiles.
2008 ETA asesina a Isaías Carrasco, ex concejal del PSE-EE en el ayuntamiento de Mondragón, a los 42 años de edad. Se suspende la campaña electoral.
2008 Se celebra en Santo Domingo (República Dominicana) la XX Cumbre del Grupo de Río de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina.
1996 Palestina: Se constituye el primer Parlamento elegido democráticamente.
1991 España: El Congreso aprueba la creación del Instituto Cervantes.
1989 Irán rompe relaciones diplomáticas con Gran Bretaña por la novela de Salman Rushdie “Versos satánicos”.
1972 El cardenal Vicente Enrique y Tarancón es nombrado presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal española.
1966 España: El ministro Manuel Fraga se baña en la playa de Palomares, donde cayó una Bomba H estadounidense, para demostrar que no existe peligro de radioactividad.
1938 Guerra civil española: Hundimiento del crucero “Baleares”.
1936 La Wehrmacht entra a la Renania desmilitarizada.
1911 Revolución en México
1905 Rusia: Los campesinos queman los castillos de sus opresores.
1876 Alexander Graham Bell patenta el teléfono, basado en diseños de Antonio Meucci
1835 Argentina: Segundo gobierno de Juan Manuel de Rosas.
Nacimientos Notables en Marzo 7 …

1988 Olesya Rulin; actriz y modelo estadounidense.
1973 Alex O’Dogherty, actor español.
1973 Sebastien Izambard; cantante francés (Il Divo).
1972 Nathalie Poza, actriz española.
1971 Peter Sarsgaard; actor estadounidense.
1971 Rachel Weisz; actriz británica.
1964 Bret Easton Ellis; novelista estadounidense.
1960 Ivan Lendl; tenista checo.
1958 Alan Hale; astrónomo estadounidense.
1958 Rik Mayall; humorista británico, cocreador de Bottom.
1945 Arthur Lee; cantante de la banda estadounidense Love.
1944 Townes Van Zandt; cantautor estadounidense.
1943 Chris White; músico británico (The Zombies).
1940 Daniel J. Travanti; actor estadounidense.
1940 Rudi Dutschke; líder estudiantil alemán.
1938 David Baltimore; biólogo estadounidense, Premio Nobel en 1975.
1936 Antonio Mercero; director de cine español.
1927 Josep MªEspinas; escritor catalan
1925 Manuel Gago; historietista español, creador de “El Guerrero del Antifaz”.
1922 Olga Ladyzhenskaya; matemática rusa.
1915 Jacques Chaban-Delmas; político francés.
1908 Anna Magnani; actriz italiana.
1906 Alejandro García Caturla, compositor cubano.
1906 Ramón Carrillo; Primer ministro de Salud de Argentina
1904 Reinhard Heydrich; político e ideólogo nazi alemán.
1902 Heinz Rühmann; actor alemán.
1875 Maurice Ravel; compositor y pianista francés.
1872 Piet Mondrian; pintor neerlandés.
1857 Julius Wagner-Jauregg; médico austríaco, premio Nobel de Medicina en 1927.
1850 Tomás Masaryk, primer presidente de Checoslovaquia
1837 Henry Draper; médico y astrónomo
1805 Juana de Vega; escritora española.
1792 John Herschel; astrónomo y matemático inglés.
1785 Alessandro Manzoni ; escritor italiano.
Fallecimientos Notables en Marzo 7 …

2009 Tullio Pinelli, guionista de cine italiano (n. 1908).
2008 Antonio Colino, ingeniero y académico español (n. 1914).
2008 Isaías Carrasco Miguel, político español (n. 1966).
2008 Luisa Isabel Álvarez de Toledo y Maura, noble española (n. 1936).
2007 Eduardo Darnauchans, músico uruguayo.
2007 Ernest Gallo, empresario del vino estadounidense.
2000 William Donald Hamilton, biólogo británico.
1999 Stanley Kubrick, director de cine estadounidense.
1993 Albert Crommlynck, pintor y grabador belga.
1988 Divine, actor y cantante estadounidense.
1986 Georgia O’Keefe, pintora estadounidense.
1983 Igor Markevitch, músico italiano de origen ruso.
1975 Mijail Bajtín, crítico literario y lingüista ruso.
1944 Miguel Andrés Camino, poeta argentino.
1932 Aristide Briand, político francés, premio Nobel de la Paz en 1926.
1931 Theo Van Doesburg, artista holandés.
1911 Antonio Fogazzaro, escritor italiano.
1908 Manuel Curros Enríquez, escritor español.
1890 Claudio Moyano, político español.
1809 Jean Pierre Blanchard, inventor francés.
1809 Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, músico y teórico austriaco.
1724 Papa Inocencio XIII.
1517 María de Aragón y Castilla, hija de Los Reyes Católicos, infanta de Castilla y Aragón y reina consorte de Portugal.
1274 Tomás de Aquino, filósofo y teólogo cristiano, santo católico.
0161 Antonio Pío, emperador romano.
.

.

History Channel: 

“Also on this Day”

  • Lead Story

  • 1876 Alexander Graham Bell patents the telephone
  • American Revolution

  • 1777 Five letters pass between Abigail and John Adams
  • Automotive

  • 1938 Janet Guthrie, first female Indy 500 driver, born
  • Civil War

  • 1862 Battle of Pea Ridge (Elkhorn Tavern), Arkansas
  • Cold War

  • 1950 Soviet Union denies Klaus Fuchs served as its spy
  • Crime

  • 2002 Defense rests in Andrea Yates trial
  • Disaster

  • 1988 Cyclone Bola hits New Zealand
  • General Interest

  • 1936 Hitler reoccupies the Rhineland
  • 1973 Bangladesh’s first democratic leader
  • 1999 Stanley Kubrick dies
  • Hollywood

  • 1988 Writers Guild of America strike begins
  • 2010 Kathryn Bigelow becomes the first female director to win an Oscar
  • Literary

  • 1923 “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening” is published
  • Music

  • 1974 Pearl Bailey and Richard Nixon serenade a White House audience
  • Old West

  • 1885 Kansas quarantines Texas cattle
  • Presidential

  • 1977 Carter meets with Yitzhak Rabin
  • Sports

  • 1987 Mike Tyson unifies titles
  • Vietnam War

  • 1966 U.S. jets launch heaviest air raids of the war
  • 1967 Republic of Korea forces operation launch
  • 1972 Jets engage in aerial combat
  • World War I

  • 1918 Finland signs treaty with Germany
  • World War II

  • 1941 British forces arrive in Greece
.

.


 El Calendario: Hoy en la Historia


Source: Associated Press | hispanopolis.com | history.com | news.bbc.co.uk  | Efemérides:  Por Juan Ramón Ortega Aguilera | istopiahistoria.blogspot.it | WIKI | YouTube | Google 

.

(Media - Bambinoides)


The views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher or bambinoides.com. Images accompanying posts are either owned by the author of said post or are in the public domain and included by the publisher of the blog bambinoides.com on its initiative.

Leave a comment

You must be Logged in to post comment.

Subscribe to our Newsletter


Escoja al menos una:

Después de enviar...
Verifique su buzón de correo electrónico.

Para modificar o editar la suscripción activa favor usar el enlace en fondo página del boletín recibido mediante correo electrónico.

Gracias por suscribirse.
WP-Backgrounds Lite by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann 1010 Wien
Confrontando la información, - el pasado y el presente...
"Estudia el pasado si quieres pronosticar el futuro". (Confucio)